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Gravity Waves and Gravitational Waves are Not the Same Thing

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As I write this, the physics world is buzzing with the news that the LIGO team have finally detected one of the most elusive phenomena in the Universe – gravitational waves.  This is the first time that gravitational waves have been directly detected – we’ve known their existence indirectly, through observations of binary pulsars made in the 1970s, which won the Nobel Prize in 1993.

A very common mistake (in both academic and media circles) is to confuse gravity waves and gravitational waves, like this Wired article’s title, or this from the Wall Street Journal (even Google displays results for gravitational waves when you type gravity waves). I’m here to tell you they’re not the same thing. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: So, should you wait until Monday to take your child to hospital?

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Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We conclude the undergraduate entries today with the overall undergraduate winner, Abbey Wrathall at the University of Edinburgh. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: How did The Sun work out that “1 in 5 Brit Muslims have sympathy for jihadis”?

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Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We’re now onto the special undergraduate subject prizes, with David McElroy at Abertay University winning the Social Policy prize, sponsored by the School of Social Work and Social Policy at the University of Strathclyde. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: Ötzi the Iceman and his bacteria – did he really suffer?

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Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We’re now onto the special undergraduate subject prizes, with Dalia Sara Gala at the University of Glasgow winning the History prize, sponsored by the Scottish History Society. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: Can films really boost your memory?

***PICTURES FREE FIRST USE - PLEASE BYLINE 'Helen Pugh Photography' ****

Scientist Dr Bunhead helped the celebrations go with a bang today at the Rewrite the Headlines awards at Our Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh.

Rewrite the Headlines is a national competition encouraging school children and students to explore how the latest research is turned into headline news, and the winners are announced today (28 January).

Working with schools and universities throughout Scotland, the Rewrite the Headlines competition aimed to help young people better understand what research is, how it gets translated from specialised areas to popular media, and then how they might translate it back.

The initiative was run by the academics and researchers behind Research the Headlines, a blog which discusses research and the media, created by members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland.
After completing workshops, schools were encouraged to find their own media report of research, unpick the story and then give the piece their own new headline. This new headline and a short explanation of their changes formed their entry into the Rewrite the Headlines competition.

The winning class, from St Roch’s Primary & Hearing Impaired School, Glasgow, turned the recent headline ‘Processed meats do cause cancer – WHO’, into ‘Eating processed meat slightly increases risk of cancer’. The research story was one which had generated a lot of interest and confusion when originally released and the judges were impressed with how the class explained their new headline.

For interviews or queries regarding Rewrite the Headlines, contact Alan Gow (A.J.Gow@hw.ac.uk).
© Helen Pugh Photography
Tel: 07837 533051
www.helenpughphotography.com

Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We’re now onto the special undergraduate subject prizes, with Sarah Keith at the University of Aberdeen winning the Social Science prize, sponsored by Palgrave Macmillan and the Social Research Association. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: OMG, Bacon Causes Cancer! (When Pigs Fly….)

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Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We continue with another of our commended undergraduate entries, from Ajay Shah at the University of St. Andrews. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: “Dr. Dillner’s Dilemma”

***PICTURES FREE FIRST USE - PLEASE BYLINE 'Helen Pugh Photography' ****

Scientist Dr Bunhead helped the celebrations go with a bang today at the Rewrite the Headlines awards at Our Dynamic Earth in Edinburgh. Pictured is Sinead Rhodes, Emmi de Vries and Dr Alan Gow, Heriot Watt University.

Rewrite the Headlines is a national competition encouraging school children and students to explore how the latest research is turned into headline news, and the winners are announced today (28 January).

Working with schools and universities throughout Scotland, the Rewrite the Headlines competition aimed to help young people better understand what research is, how it gets translated from specialised areas to popular media, and then how they might translate it back.

The initiative was run by the academics and researchers behind Research the Headlines, a blog which discusses research and the media, created by members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland.
After completing workshops, schools were encouraged to find their own media report of research, unpick the story and then give the piece their own new headline. This new headline and a short explanation of their changes formed their entry into the Rewrite the Headlines competition.

The winning class, from St RochÕs Primary & Hearing Impaired School, Glasgow, turned the recent headline ÔProcessed meats do cause cancer Ð WHOÕ, into ÔEating processed meat slightly increases risk of cancerÕ. The research story was one which had generated a lot of interest and confusion when originally released and the judges were impressed with how the class explained their new headline.

For interviews or queries regarding Rewrite the Headlines, contact Alan Gow (A.J.Gow@hw.ac.uk).
© Helen Pugh Photography
Tel: 07837 533051
www.helenpughphotography.com

Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We continue with another of our commended undergraduate entries, from Emmi de Vries at the University of Glasgow. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: Can societies without electricity reveal how our ancestors slept?

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Over the first few weeks of February, we’re showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories of our Rewrite the Headlines competition (full list of winners here). We continue with another of our commended undergraduate entries, from Hannah Miller at the University of Glasgow. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines: Will a square jaw help Trump win in 2016?

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At the end of January, we were delighted to announce the winners of Rewrite the Headlines, our national competition encouraging school children and students to explore how the latest research is turned into headline news. You can view the full list of winners here, and over the first few weeks of February we’ll be showcasing the top entries in both the school and undergraduate categories. We begin with one of the commended undergraduate entries, from Fraser Barker at the University of Strathclyde. Read more…

Rewrite the Headlines – And the winner is…

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Primary school children and university students have been unpicking the evidence to find the real research behind news headlines.

Rewrite the Headlines was a national competition encouraging school children and students to explore how the latest research is turned into headline news. The winners were announced yesterday at an event hosted by Our Dynamic Earth with special guest Dr Bunhead.

Working with schools and universities throughout Scotland, the Rewrite the Headlines competition aimed to help young people better understand what research is, how it gets translated from specialised areas to popular media, and then how they might translate it back.

The initiative was run by the academics and researchers behind Research the Headlines, a blog which discusses research and the media, created by members of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Young Academy of Scotland. Read more…

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